Henceforth, A. Lange & Söhne’s 1815 Tourbillon will exist in the regular pink gold case with solid silver dial version, the 1815 Tourbillon Handwerkskunst with its pink gold case showcasing the tremblage decorated, black-rhodiumed pink gold dial, and, now, the new 1815 tourbillon with its platinum case and enamel dial.

The 1815 Tourbillon in pink gold with a solid silver dial
The 1815 Tourbillon in pink gold with a solid silver dial
The 1815 Tourbillon Handwerkskunst in pink gold
The 1815 Tourbillon Handwerkskunst in pink gold
The A. Lange & Söhne 1815 Tourbillon with Enamel Dial
The A. Lange & Söhne 1815 Tourbillon with Enamel Dial

Characteristically, while each variation portrays different personas, what they all hold as common ground is the mechanical opulence that is the caliber L102.1.

With the caliber L102.1, Lange put together two of their own patented mechanisms — the Zero-Reset and Stop-Seconds — into a manual wound tourbillon movement.

Lange introduced the Zero-Reset mechanism in 1997, with the Langematik. The mechanism is such that when the watch’s crown is pulled out to the time setting position, the running seconds hand jumps back to zero and stays stationary, while the time is adjusted. As a result, when you have set the desired time, you can zero it with another time source and push back the crown to let it start running just then.

Then in 2008, Lange took the next leap incorporated the Zero-Reset with the Stop-Second function on a tourbillon! The Stop-Second mechanism is essentially there to arrest the regulating organ — the balance wheel — while the crown is in time setting mode. This assures a one-second accuracy when stopping and setting the timepiece.

This impressive mechanism can be found in the Lange 1 Tourbillon Perpetual Calendar, the Datograph Perpetual Tourbillon and, of course, our watch of focus today, the 1815 Tourbillon, just to name a few.

Marked to be produced in a limited run of 100 pieces, the platinum cased version shares nearly all of the dimensions of the original save for the height of the watch, which is now 11.3mm. The pink gold cased version is 0.2mm slimmer at 11.1mm. The excess height results from the enamel dial that is ever so slightly thicker than the regular solid silver dial. Point of interest: Even the number 12 is red enamel, making this quite the complex dial that has to be achieved with multiple layers of enameling.

More on alange-soehne.com

The A. Lange & Söhne 1815 Tourbillon with Enamel Dial

Technical Specifications: 1815 Tourbillon with Enamel Dial

Movement

Manual wound Lange manufacture calibre L102.1; one-minute tourbillon with patented Stop-Seconds mechanism and patented Zero-Reset mechanism; hours and minutes; 72-hour power reserve

Case

39.5mm in platinum

Strap

Black hand-stitched alligator leather