The brief was simple.

Concoct torture tests for the Casio G-Shock GA-100 and destroy it, recording it for posterity.

So, my colleagues from around the world submitted innovative ways of destroying it and our new assistant editor, Joy Corthésy, and I set about performing them, while shooting photos and video to document the tests.

We started out slowly, with the tests we were pretty sure wouldn’t kill it.

The first test recreated that famous science experiment, the Mentos and Soda test. Despite the geyser of soda generated by the Mentos, the G-Shock passed with flying colors.

Then, we let Milo the border terrier have his way with the watch.

It survived with nary a mark on it.

We threw it into a water fountain, we dropped it from a second story window onto the grass first, then the gravel driveway, then the flagstone forecourt. When the watch hit the flagstones, the sound it made was sickening to me as a watch lover, and I was sure it was dead.

But it wasn’t.

I even dropped a sai (an ancient Okinawan short sword) on it, and the only damage was a small deformation on the back case. I then strapped it to my BOB punching bag and hit and kicked it as hard as I could, and it withstood it all.

Then, I put it into the freezer overnight.

The next morning, I took it out and it had stopped running, the display blank. I thought the test was over. I put it into boiling water right away anyway, determined to finish torturing it.

After 10 seconds in the boiling water, I took it out and it was running perfectly.

I was starting to think that this was the watch that wouldn’t die.

I then dragged it behind my motorcycle, taking off across the driveway and up the dirt and gravel track into the vineyards, the G-Shock slamming around behind me.

Didn’t miss a beat.

We ran over it with an Audi A3, and the only damage was a pusher that was stuck in the depressed position. One push and it popped right back out and ran like a champ.

Next up, I smacked it with a wooden baseball bat. The first swing, a single, no problem. The second swing, probably a double, broke the strap and the third swing, maybe a home run, killed the movement. The display was intact, but not working.

So, I continued with the golf club, a seven iron. That shattered the crystal and ruined the LCD display.

We had done it; we had killed the G-Shock. I had never set out to destroy a watch before, and I was conflicted. I didn’t particularly enjoy torturing the G-Shock, but it was really fun to see what the watch could withstand, which was a lot.

I have to tell you, I am seriously impressed. This watch, the G-Shock GA-100 (Module No. 5081), survived tests that no mechanical watch could have.

Is the G-Shock worth the money to have a do-everything watch?

After the barrage of tests we put it through, the answer is absolutely.

In fact, I’m looking into buying one right now.